Attitudes and Attitude Change

27 Chapter Reflections

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  1. The Elaboration Likelihood Model (“ELM”) also presented as the “Central and Peripheral Route to Persuasion” demonstrates the different ways in which consumers process a message relative to their involvement: high involvement (central); low involvement (peripheral). Read this article published by Odyssey Online titled “An Attempt To Understand Why People Support Donald Trump” about how the Central and Peripheral Routes to Persuasion provide a basis of understanding related to the outcome of the 2016 Presidential election. Discuss the similarities between consumer decision making and politics with reference to this model.
  2. As we learned in this chapter, changing attitudes can be an uphill battle for marketers. Persuasive messaging is one way we can attempt to change consumers’ attitudes and often behaviour as well. In this video by Boulder Ignite, discuss how Ash Beckham successfully persuades her audience to reconsider using the word “gay” as a pejorative in our language. What makes Ash a credible “source” in delivering this important message?
  3. After the 2016 US Presidential elections which brought Donald Trump to power, many counter-movements were created so voters, consumers, activists, and members of society could make their disapproving voices heard. One such movement, known as “Grab Your Wallet” (#grabyourwallet) has energized consumers across America (and even into Canada) to boycott brands that carry any Trump products – mostly notably was the case of Nordstrom’s dropping Ivanka Trump’s merchandise from their retail stores in early 2017. The #GrabYourWallet campaign started on social media and now several years later, has turned into one of the biggest consumer activism campaigns on record. Using this campaign as an example, discuss how the Balance Theory of Attitudes could have predicted the demise of the relationship between the “Trump name” and retailers such as Nordstrom.

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